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Discussion > Comment on Cannery kitbash

Just a couple of notes to go with the pictures on the blog. The model is 1/4" scale. At this size, it works better to laminate the cardstock walls to a stiffer substrate; in this case 3/16" foam core (black, with a black foam) and Strathmore board (black all the way through) Using black hides areas where you didn't cover it...look under the eaves, for example. Sometimes non-black works best...the back panel of a Bienfang tracing paper pad matched the wood color of the dock, so the top is laminated to it, not folded over the edge, and the chipboard edge distressed a bit and board joints marked with a fine point marker.

The roll up freight door did not fit the period, so it needed new doors. They are made up from TO-365 `12" wood plank with nails printed at 50% giving 6" boards. Interior floors are this, also. Another "size adjustment" is the cupola roof, which is the cannery vent roof printed at 60% The windows were added to suit, with frames from the cannery sheets and white sash from plain white cardstock. (white sash windows in an otherwise unpainted or weathered building were typical of the period.

The foundation "stone" was left over from Kirk's Books.

There are times when paper works better (for me at least) than cardstock. For example, the dock supports are paper glued around basswood square stock, as the paper gives sharper edges (tighter fold) And the chimneys again are paper wrapped around balsa. (the "raised brick" trim is two thicknesses of cardstock glued on as separate strips on each side with no attempt at folding.)

All in all it was a lot of fun, and once glued together no painting and weathering required!
June 7, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterBob Bruce
Bob, Thanks for the added insight on your process. We have always encouraged builders to modify, explore and find better paths to great results. I myself have just recently started using chipboard backings on all my building projects in HO.
Thanks for sharing.
I'm also going to re_post a pic or two over at Model railroad kit forums. We get a lot of visits from those folks and they have been somewhat supportive.
June 7, 2013 | Registered CommenterThom
bob:
what thickness strathmore board did you use?, and where did you find black strathmore?
thanks
mel perry
June 8, 2013 | Unregistered Commentermel perry
I used "Strathmore Museum Mat Board", all black, in 4-ply weight, about 1.5 mm. . It also comes in 2-ply, more like bristol board. I got it on sale at a local art supply; but it is available at Dick Blick and other art supply chains. It is a little more expensive than cheap boards but one sheet builds a lot of buildings!

I use this where the thickness of the material can be viewed, like the roofs. For larger walls, I use all black foam core. A useful technique with foam core is to cut it down to just the thickness of one face. Slice away one face and the core, leaving the other face intact. This allows you to rabbet the corners, much easier than cutting them at a 45 degree angle (and stronger) Once you get the feel for cutting part way through, you can cut it to a single face thickness wherever you need to, as around windows and doors. It is easier to cut than mat or chipboard and gives a strong structure.
June 8, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterBob Bruce
bob:
thanks for the lead, i've always just used the 1/2 and 4 ply regular white strathmore, i guess the black mat must be in the
framing department, also when you slice the foam board, does it split evenly, or in pieces? and it retains its rigidity?
thanks
mel perry
June 8, 2013 | Unregistered Commentermel perry
Mel;
"Splitting" isn't quite what you do. Perpendicular to the surface you cut through the top face with one pass then another lighter pass to cut through just the soft foam, without cutting through the bottom face. It sounds harder than it is. Then you cut away the foam by sliding your knife horizontally through the foam above the bottom face. You do not have to go clear to the back of the bottom face, because you can then use a chisel blade to scrape away whatever foam is left, exposing the smooth back of the bottom face. This cut away part is not very rigid, as what is left is about like bristol. If you are rabbeting vertical corners, this would be the last step you would do after completing all the work you wanted to do on that wall since it weakens that projecting part.

If this is not clear I can do some photos of the process. Regards, Bob
June 8, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterBob Bruce
bob:
i got it, many thanks
mel perry
June 8, 2013 | Unregistered Commentermel perry